Foods

Interesting Facts You Need To Know About “Penis Fish

A weeks ago in the month of December 2019, David Ford was visiting Drake’s Bay on the coast of Northern California, in the United States, when he saw what appeared to be thousands of severed Inn Keepers washed up on the shore.

Penis Fish are 10-inch-long and pink in complexion creatures known as “Inn Keepers”.

“I had no idea what they might be… it went on for two miles,” Ford told Vice. “I walked for another half hour and they were scattered everywhere. There were seagulls lined up the beach the whole way having eaten so much they could barely stand. A quarter of them looked like they were still alive. The rest were dead, they had a dead sea-creature smell.”

Ford in his curiosity took a photo of these creatures on December 6 and shared it with the magazine Bay Nature for their “Ask the Naturalist” segment.

Ford asked Ivan Parr, a biologist, “I saw thousands of these on Drakes Beach on December 6, after the recent storm. What happened ?”

The Fat Inn Keeper Worms are rarely seen as they live in U-shaped burrows underground their entire lives. But tropical storms can displace them by their tens of thousands, as David Ford saw on Drake’s Bay.

Strong storms are capable of laying siege to the intertidal zone, breaking apart the sediments, and leaving their contents stranded on shore.” Parr wrotenin an Article.

The Penis Fish inhabit low intertidal to subtidal areas from Southern Oregon to Tijuana Slough, Mexico. They are mostly spotted between Bodega Bay and Monterey, around 200 miles away.

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT “PENIS FISH” INN KEEPERS

1. The Worms Are Considered useful as a very Rich Delicacy in South Korea

Innkeeper worms are known as “gaebul” or “dog genitals”, in South Korean and are considered a delicious treat.

These fishes are known to be very chewy and very sweet from marinating in salt water for so long.

Koreans describe the taste as a natural, mildly pleasant sweetness that you’ll often taste in seafood.

The worms are sweetest and most plentiful from December to March. They are traditionally consumed raw after being dipped in sauce, usually chogochujan (vinegared gochujang). Similar to Oysters, they are meant to be cut up and eaten right away.

Not everybody eats them on the spot. Some koreans near the West Sea prefer to eat theirs with kimchi and others skewer ones are grilled with salt, pepper and sesame oil seasoning.

R

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *